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  • Steve Fogelman

Recognizing Your Soul Purpose

There are many reasons we come to Earth: with a soul purpose, a soul mission, a life purpose and life mission. And they all don’t have to be the same nor work together, though people may find themselves in crisis if they are diametrically opposed in value.


While falling in love and raising a family might be your life purpose, the one thing that everyone’s soul purpose has in common is that it revolves around service to humanity. That is not to say you must touch every human life, but selflessly serving human life is what drives you.That’s why volunteer work can be so fulfilling as it’s part of your purpose for existing. One of my favorite quotes I found online reads: “Helping one person might not change the whole world, but it could change the whole world for one person.”


Perhaps if your life purpose is as a health care worker or practitioner, social worker or clergyman, that may also be a soul purpose, but one’s job is not always their soul purpose. You can have a low-paying job or a high-paying one you hate and be completely unfulfilled in your life purpose, but maybe volunteering at a senior home in the evenings or weekends somehow makes you feel alive.


Philanthropy and donations to worthy causes, while admirable, is not so much fulfilling a soul purpose, but more connected to the energy of tithing. When money is donated with someone’s name attached to be displayed, that means there is still ego involved and not connected to soul purpose, regardless of how generous. Soul purpose is selfless with no agenda but to help, so anonymous donations, whenever possible carry the strongest helping energy.


Donations from The Bill Gates Foundation may not be part of Bill’s soul purpose, but his life’s contribution to the development of personal computers has greatly improved humanity and fulfills a soul purpose.


Again, do not be concerned with effecting the whole world. You only need to positively effect one life to make a difference.